Showing posts with label Bizarre Bridgewater Triangle. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bizarre Bridgewater Triangle. Show all posts

Clear "Class-A" Bridgewater Triangle Bigfoot Sighting in Freetown

2009 was a hot year the Bridgewater Triangle for Bigfoot sightings in the vicinity of Freetown, the town that serves as the western angle of the delineated map of this bizarre area.  The most interesting of these accounts happened on July 14th of that year, when a young man and his girlfriend spotted a "large brown hair-covered "man" standing up from a crouched position on the side of a two lane highway."

This witness immediately reported his sighting to the BFRO, who interviewed him three weeks after the incident. The following is the witness' report to the Bigfoot Field Research Organization:

"My girlfriend and I were riding in my Jeep on Route 140 from New Bedford to Freetown tonight and at about 11:00 my girlfriend saw this large brown hair covered "man" standing up from a crouched position on the side of the two lane highway. She lets out a scream prompting me to look at the creature standing there. He made fluid movements like a man and had an almost ape-like quality. We couldn't see his face but upon returning to the area we saw the "man" there was nothing. After calling 911 and telling them that someone was running in the median of the highway they told us that they had similar reports of what we saw on the stretch of highway between exit 7 (Braley Rd.) and exit 8 (Chase Rd.) They then told me that they were sending state troopers to investigate."

And here is is BFRO Investigator D.A. Brake's Official Report on the incident:
The witness (driver) was phone interviewed approximately three weeks after submitting the report. The girlfriend did not want to talk about the incident since the memory of it still upset her. A 30 minute inquiry and site visit to the specific area of the sighting provided some additional details summarized below. The witness was driving northbound and traveling approximately 70 mph in the left/passing lane closest to the divided highway median. The depressed grass median between Exits 7 and 8 of the north and southbound lanes is approximately 40 yards wide. The witness stated that the animal had a wide midsection covered in brown body hair, darker brown, long arms and was approximately 7- to 8-feet tall based on the height of a highway mile marker that was just adjacent to where the animal was standing. The witness also stated that the animal had a long chiseled jaw. The total duration of the sighting was approximately 3 seconds from the time the witness turned his head and first saw the animal until his car passed the creature. As his car passed the animal which was standing only 3-4 feet to the left of the hood of his Jeep, the witness reported having a scared sensation and noted that the animal had one arm down and the other arm up in a bent position as if getting ready to cross the northbound lane. The witness exited the highway approximately two miles north of the sighting and traveled back southbound to the point of the sighting but did not see anything unusual.  Although the placement of the 911 call by the witness was not confirmed, the witness reported that he subsequently had an informal discussion of the sighting with a friend who is a Massachusetts State Trooper whom was on call that night. The police officer told him that the local dispatcher did receive several related calls around the same time that evening, and he and several other troopers responded to the call and arrested several teenagers who were in the general area. However, upon receiving this information, the witness remained steadfast in his belief that what he saw was not a teenager playing a prank. The location of this sighting is immediately west of the Bolton Cedar Swamp, recognized as an important conservation land tract comprised of wetlands, ponds, bogs and acidic swamps vegetated with Atlantic White Cedar, pitch pine and scrub oak. The sighting occurred approximately three miles southeast of the eastern border of the Freetown-Fall River State Forest. This state forest marks the western point of the ‘Bridgewater Triangle’, an area of approximately 200 square miles that has had numerous reports of paranormal activity dating as far back 350 years when Native American Tribes and colonists co-inhabited the area.”




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Flying Saucers, Baseball & Fireballs in the Bridgewater Triangle

1-23-2014 Correction: The Abington sighting was in October of 2012, not October of 2013.

A recent wave of UFOs have been sighted in the area of the Bridgewater Triangle, as well as all over the world. These sightings differ immensely from the flying saucer, metallic-colored disk shaped sightings of the crafts sighted in 1940s to the 1960s and the triangle-shaped  craft seen by many in the area in the 1970s. These UFOs are glowing fireballs flying in formation. Usually five—sometimes six--glowing spheres, sometimes moving at incredibly high speeds, sometimes rotating in formation.

The first of these local sightings was on October 12, 2013. Five orbs floated in over the Boston skyline and were captured on video by a witness in a nearby Boston skyscraper. Here is a clip of the sighting.
Two nights later, these same objects would be seen and captured in Abington, this time zipping toward Boston.

A month later, on November 20th, A Bridgewater University student would see them again in Bridgewater, and would also capture the sighting on video.
Many others saw this sky event in the area. And some were reported to the National UFO Reporting Center. Two of these reports were also about sightings in Bridgewater on the night of November 20th. One witness saw six “orange fireballs” in the sky moving “slowly in a pattern” and then disappearing one by one. Another reported seeing the “orange lights rising into the sky”, subsequently curving into a circle formation and again, disappearing one by one after about five minutes. Another Bridgewater witness reported seeing “six lights in formation of the Big Dipper-then looking closer, they moved changing formation. They were hovering over a house fairly low. I pulled over to photo them. As I did again they changed formation till they were in a vertical straight line. Then they went up and disappeared.”

Many other sightings of the same phenomenon were reported from the towns of Hanover, Weymouth, New Bedford, and Swansea, as well as Bridgewater, in a ten week span from October to early December.
This recent rash of sightings inspired me to research waves

of UFO activity in southeastern Massachusetts, from Boston to the South Shore. I dug into newspaper archives to see if there were other times in history where mass sightings were documented. I wasn’t disappointed. There was indeed. I found some absolutely intriguing (not to mention BIZARRE) accounts documented in the Boston Globe. The most unusual of these being a mass sighting in Boston over Braves Field in 1947.

On July 11, 1947--just two days after in infamous Roswell Incident--the Boston Globe reported the following: 

"Greater Boston stepped into the lead in the new American past time--spotting flying saucers--when 200 persons in one group 200 sighted one of the elusive disks flying over Brave's Field floating so low over the field during the game that it was in danger of being shattered by a high flying ball.” 

Nearby at the Magazine Beach Club in Cambridge on the Charles, an estimated 200 beach goers witnessed the “flying disk.” 

Irving Appleby, manager of the Magazine Beach bathhouse in Cambridge, backed up by 200 persons who were on the beach who saw the disk. And 200 people can’t be wrong. Appleby was quick to declare, “I don’t know what it was, and I am not a crackpot. But we saw something and looked like a saucer. He claimed the disk was only about four feet in diameter and appeared out of a large cloud floating by. The disk then “glided toward earth” appearing to land someone around Brighton, after a near collision with power lines.

Another very unusual mass sighting occurred in 1972 when hundreds of South Shore residents witnessed a “silvery, triangle transparent object” moving west between 8 and 9 pm on the Fourth of July. The craft was seen in the towns Cohasset, Hingham, Marshfield, Hanover, Rockland, Hanson and Whitman.

Dozens of calls came into Weymouth and Hanscom Naval Bases. An Air Force representative confirmed that they received many calls about the craft from nervous citizens, but declared, “We don’t know what it was.”

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Bridgewater Triangle Alligators: Eight Gator Sightings Documented By Newspapers



An alligator in Brockton is captured by a local firefighter in the summer of
2010 after it is seen crossing a residential street. 

1. July, 1929. Abington
A five-foot long alligator is seen “roaming about wherever he chooses and devouring whatever appeals to his taste." The gator is not captured.

2. March, 2005. Rehoboth 
A local boy encountered two alligators. He kills one, while the other gets away. The second reptile is never found.

3. July, 2005, Middleboro
A 5-foot alligator is found in Stump Pond in Middleboro. Police lure the creature out of the water with a chicken as bait. 

3. July, 2005, Brockton
A 4 ½ foot alligator makes an appearance at D.W. Field Park in Brockton. After a small chase, police are able to capture the gator.

4. August, 2005, Brockton
A second alligator is spotted at D.W. Field Park in Brockton.

5. September, 2005. Abington
A five-foot long alligator takes up residence at Island Grove pond. The creature is not caught.

6. May, 2010. Brockton. 
Yet another rash of alligator sightings at D.W. Field Park. The gator is not found.

7. July, 2010. Middleboro 
A fisherman in Middleboro catches a 2-foot long baby alligator out of the Nemasket River and brings it to the nearby State Police barracks.

8. August, 2010
A Brockton firefighter on his way to work one morning spots a 3-foot alligator crossing the street. The alligator is wearing a leather spiked collar and is dragging behind him a leash. The firefighter swiftly captures the gator.









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Top Ten Oddities of the Bridgewater Triangle

The "Human Skeleton," Isaac Sprague, hailed from the Bridgewater Triangle.

1. The longest epitaph in the United States is located in a Rehoboth cemetery



2. Three P.T. Barnham circus "freaks" hailed from here, including Middleboro's Tom Thumb and East Bridgewater's "The Human Skeleton" 



3. The first boundary line in the United States is located in Abington at the Bridgewater Triangle’s furthest most delineated northern map point.



4. In the summer of 2014, a beluga whale--a species usually found in the arctic--was spotted in the Bridgewater Triangle making its way down the Taunton River. Soon after, the whale would be followed by the world's second largest shark species, for a basking shark was seen and caught on video in the same exact river.


5. In 1906, bones of “a giant” were discovered in Middleboro


6. Alligators, seals, emu, peacocks, cow moose, bears, Africal Sevral, panthers and mountain lions have all been found in the Bridgewater Triangle


7. There are both hand prints and footprints embedded into several Bridgewater Triangle boulders; hand prints and a footprint in Middleboro, footprints in Norton


8. Dighton Rock is the first documented petroglyph in the United States


9. The chocolate chip cookie was invented in the happiest of accidents in the northern apex of the Bridgewater Triangle


10. The Bridgewater Triangle is host to the world's only shovel museum, located in Easton






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The Bridgewater Triangle's Devil's Footprints

The Devil's Footprints can still be seen today imprinted in a large boulder in
Norton, Massachusetts. Photo by Kristen Good

“As he turned up the soil unconsciously, his staff struck against something hard. He raked it out of the vegetable mould, and lo! a cloven skull with an Indian tomahawk buried deep in it, lay before him. The rust on the weapon showed the time that had elapsed since this death blow had been given. It was a dreary memento of the fierce struggle that had taken place in this last foothold of the Indian warriors.” The Devil and Tom Walker, Washington Irving, 1824.

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Who needs the tales of Washington Irving when you have the history of the “Leonard Family of Taunton”? The Leonard family history sounds like a Washington Irving tale, with its themes of pacts with the Satan, devil's footprints, buried bones, a man on galloping on horseback through the woods carrying a severed head…even sacred Indian land. Washington Irving, most famous for spinning the legendary yarn,“The Legend of Sleepy Hollow,” wrote a short story called “The Devil and Tom Walker” in 1824. In many ways, Irving's story of a man who makes a pact with the devil, exchanging the promise of his soul in return for riches, mirrors the legend of the very real George Leonard, a wealthy ironworker who figures prominently in the history of the town of Norton.

According to the Norton Historical Society: “It is said that Leonard made a league with the devil in order to acquire great wealth. He promised his body to the devil when he died. Leonard became very rich and an influential citizen of the town. In 1716 when Leonard died, the devil came to claim his body. Surprised in the act, the devil climbed out a window. He jumped so hard on a nearby boulder, that he left footprints there. One can see those footprints on the rock by the parking lot of the Solomonese School. The mansion was situated at the corner of West Main and North Worcester Streets where Chartley Corner Plaza is today,” Says the Norton Historical society about the legend. Norton Historical Society’s George Yelle says that while he is not a believer in the paranormal, he has to admit he found it odd that when he was filmed for a local cable station special about the Devil’s Footprints at the rock he had to do the entire shoot over again. The producers of the show contacted Yelle and explained–though this had never happened before in their careers–inexplicably his interview at the Devil’s Footprints was now blank and they needed to schedule a reshoot. The second attempt at filming was successful. Washington Irving's tale of another fortune-seeking Colonial character that Irving named Tom Walker, also has a man on horseback encounter a man in black in the dark woods, but Irving places Walker in a dark swamp:

“One day that Tom Walker had been to a distant part of the neighbourhood, he took what he considered a short cut homewards through the swamp. Like most short cuts, it was an ill chosen route. The swamp was thickly grown with great gloomy pines and hemlocks, some of them ninety feet high; which made it dark at noonday, and a retreat for all the owls of the neighbourhood. In Irvings tale, Walker's destination is an old Indian Fort. “At length he arrived at a piece of firm ground, which ran out like a peninsula into the deep bosom of the swamp. It had been one of the strong holds of the Indians during their wars with the first colonists. Here they had thrown up a kind of fort which they had looked upon as almost impregnable, and had used as a place of refuge for their squaws and children.” “It was late in the dusk of evening that Tom Walker reached the old fort, and he paused there for a while to rest himself. Anyone but he would have felt unwilling to linger in this lonely melancholy place, for the common people had a bad opinion of it from the stories handed down from the time of the Indian wars; when it was asserted that the savages held incantations here and made sacrifices to the evil spirit. Tom Walker, however, was not a man to be troubled with any fears of the kind. As he turned up the soil unconsciously, his staff struck against something hard. He raked it out of the vegetable mould, and lo! a cloven skull with an Indian tomahawk buried deep in it, lay before him. It was a dreary memento of the fierce struggle that had taken place in this last foothold of the Indian warriors.”

 Strange that George Leonard’s grandfather played a role in that very Indian wars Irving refers to. Because this story of the Leonard’s begins with Thomas Leonard, George Leonard’s grandfather, who was among the first men to settle the area of Taunton in the area now known as Raynham. The son of an English iron worker, Thomas Leonard and his brother immediately set out to build the first successful iron forge in the country, using the rich iron ore deposits of nearby Fowling Pond and Lake Nippenicket. Fowling Pond has long since disappeared, now a swath of land known as Pine Swamp on King Philip’s Street. Reportedly two miles long and nearly three-quarters of mile wide, historians of the 19th century recorded recollections of old timers who remembered swimming and boating on Fowling Pond in their youth.

Fowling Pond. Image courtesy of Old Colony Historical Society.

How Fowling Pond, once the summer camp of King Philip (Massasoit’s son) disappeared is a bit of a mystery. “Perhaps a great storm cut a swath through the embankment and drained the pond, it is one of nature’s curiosities where once King Philip rested and summered on the banks of a beautiful body of water and the tribe stocked to food to last through the long cold months ahead, there is now nothing left but the tall trees rising from a murky swamp.” Carolyn Owen, former Old Colony Historical Society Archivist. Before 1670, Thomas Leonard built a house that might have been the oldest house in country to bare the scars of war. It was said until at least the 1900s, there was “an ancient case of drawers that used to stand in this house upon which the deep scars of King Philip’s War and mangled impressions are to be seen” that was still in existence. Until its destruction in 1850, the Leonard house was officially the oldest mansion in the country The house was enormous compared to America’s standards at the time. Thomas Leonard would have no way of knowing that his grand home would serve as a garrison in a war that would go down as being the most grizzly, barbaric, and bloodiest war in the history of America. He would have no way of knowing that the house would be attacked by a band of Wampanoags. That two young girls would be savagely slain and buried beneath his prized porch. If he had the knowledge that the severed head of a man he considered a friend would lay in waiting in his cellar in that house, surely Leonard never would have built a house so grand. If he known. The sheer size of the“old gothic” Leonard house made it a perfect garrison. Known locally until its destruction as “The House of Seven Gables,” the old Leonard house rose two-and-half stories, framed with its famed facade gables. The house’s most unique feature was its impressive two story, gable-roofed porch.

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The “House of Seven Gables.” Courtesy of The Old Colony Historical Society.

The house served a major role in King Philip’s War– a war that would only last fourteen months and would totally decimate the Wampanoag Tribe, whose territories stretched from Halifax to Narragansett Bay in Rhode Island at the time of the war. “King Philip,” whose Native American name was either Pometacom or Metacom, was the second son of Chief Massasoit, who aided the pilgrims in their early years and taught them how to survive in an unfamiliar land. In 1675, after over ten years of tension between the tribe and the colonists, war broke out. Before the late 1800s, King Philip’s War was simply known as “The Indian War,” as Washington Irving refers to it in “The Devil and Tom Walker.” Massasoit’s first son Alexander (Wamsutta) was taken prisoner by the Plymouth Colony Militia in 1662 who mysteriously fell ill while being held for questioning in Duxbury. Many historians speculate, based on Plymouth Colony records, that Alexander was murdered. After Alexander’s death, Philip became chief and in the next thirteen years, tensions would only mount between the Wampanoag Tribe, who had inhabited the land for over 30,000 years and the English, who had been here roughly 40 years. There was no tension between the Leonard Family and the Wampanoag Tribe. The great chief and the Leonards were neighbors and spent time together in the summer when Philip “was in town” as well as traded amongst each other. The Leonards had valuable metal tools needed by the tribe. In 1675, inevitable war broke out. But King Philip gave strict orders to his warriors to spare Leonard Country from attacks and burning. He made them promise “never to harm a Leonard.” The Chief’s order was ignored at least twice. Once when James’ brother Uriah was shot at as he tried to escape on horseback, but fortunately for Leonard, the bullets shot at him by the Wampanoags simply passed through his hat.

The most tragic betrayal of King Philip’s men to their Chief’s command would be the shooting of two young girls who tried to flee the garrison (If it is indeed true.)  In 1797,  Dr. Fobes of Taunton wrote a genealogical sketch of the Leonard family. In it, this story appears for the first time. According to The Old Colony Historical Society, it seems if this happened, there would be some kind of documentation of the event, not just a blurb in a historical recollection. Fobes reported that the two girls were buried beneath the porch, (likely because the area was surrounded and people of inside the garrison, mostly woman and children, did not want to stray too far from the house to bury the two girls for fear of being shot.) Another note Fobes makes is reference to something that if it is indeed true, then was by far the most horrific act ever performed in the Old Leonard house: the “deposition” of King Philip’s head. Captured and killed on August 12, 1776, Captain Benjamin Church ordered the chief’s beheading and quartering of his body. The four corners of his body were hung in trees, Church vowing that “bones” The image of Church riding his horse, carrying around a severed head through the forests of New England on his way to present to Plymouth is gruesome indeed. That he kept the great chief’s head may have been kept at the Leonard House–King Philip’s trusted friends– is simply horrific. This writer cannot help but to wonder if James Leonard even knew, or if Church hid the head in the cellar of the garrison without consent from Leonard. Wonder is all we can do. Since no details of how long or when the head “was deposited” at the Leonard family exist on record, even the Old Colony Historical Society is forced to speculate.





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Bridgewater Triangle Monster Snakes & Vanishing Lakes



Civil Conservation Corps (CCC) workers clear a swamp.


"Huge mystery snakes have been sighted before in the Hockomock region. In 1939, Roosevelt-era CCC workers, completing a project on King Philip's Street at the edge of the swamp, reported seeing a huge snake as large around and black as a stove-pipe.' The snake coiled for a moment, raised its spade-like head and disappeared into the swamp. Local legends claim that a huge snake appears every seven years." Loren Coleman, Mysterious America: The Ultimate Guide To The Nation's Weirdest Wonders, Strangest Spots, and Creepiest Creatures.



Raynham, King Philip, Pine Swamp and Fowling Pond



Although Fowling Pond was the same size as nearby Lake Nip, this lake disappeared in less than a hundred years. By 1800, only small remnants of the pond remained. By the turn of the century, it had completely dried up to a swath of land known as Pine Swamp on King Philip's Street. In 1840, the following was included in a book called "Historical Collections of Massachusetts" by John Barber: "Fowling Pond, is itself a great curiosity. Before Philips' war it seems to have been a large pond, nearly two miles long and three quarters of a mile wide. Since then, the water is almost gone, and the large tract it once covered is grown up to a thick-set swamp of cedar and pine. That this, however, was once a large pond, haunted by fowls, and supplied with fish in great plenty, is more than probable, for here is found, upon dry land, a large quantity of white floor sand, and a great number of smooth stones, which are never found except on shores or places long washed by water."

"What could induce Philip to build his house here? It was undoubtedly, fishing and fowling, in this, then large pond. But more than than all, there is yet living in this town a man of more than ninety years old, who can well remember, than when he was a boy, he had frequently gone off in a canoe to fish in this pond; and says, that many a fish had been catched, where the pines and cedars are now more than fifty feet high. If an instance, at once so rare, and well attested, as this, should not be admitted as a curious scrap of the natural history of this country; yet it must be admitted as a strong analogical proof, that many of our swamps were originally ponds of water: but more than this, it suggests a new argument in the favor of the wisdom and goodness of that Diving Providence, which "changes the face of the earth," to supply the wants of man, as often as he changes from uncivilized nature, to a state of cultivation and refinement." (Collections of the The Massachusetts Historical Society.)

Carolyn Owen, former Old Colony Historical Society Archivist speculated on the mysterious disappearance: “Perhaps a great storm cut a swath through the embankment and drained the pond, it is one of nature’s curiosities where once King Philip rested and summered on the banks of a beautiful body of water and the tribe stocked to food to last through the long cold months ahead, there is now nothing left but the tall trees rising from a murky swamp.”

It is interesting to explore the connection between the location of the CCC worker's sighting of the monster snake and what that area was: A place King Philip called home. I personally have never heard of a disappearing lake. But if one was going to disappear, I am not surprised it vanished in the Bridgewater Triangle.

Almost every Bridgewater Triangle enthusiast knows this story. But there is much more to this legend. What Coleman didn't mention is that the King Philip's Street, located in Raynham (not Bridgewater), is home to the former summer camp of King Philip (hence the name of the street.)
King Philip's Street, Raynham, Photo by Kristen Good
In researching Fowling Pond recently, I was stunned when I stumbled across information that proved that Fowling Pond--a lake reported to have been a sizable body of water that mysteriously disappeared by the turn of the century--was on a tract of land now known as Pine Swamp. THIS, not Hockomock Swamp--as legend has it--is the true location of the Civil Conservation Corps workers terrifying sighting in the 1939.

Fowling Pond, I learned  (a very sacred spot to the Wampanoag) was the summer home of the great King Philip, Metacom, Chief of the Wampanoag Tribe, until the end of the war that was named after him; when he has shot, dismembered, his remains being intentionally scattered throughout southern Massachusetts so that his "soul would never rest." In times of peace Metacom spent many a summer night on the shores of Fowling pond in Raynham.
Fowling Pond--King Phillip's Summer home--was a pond the size of nearby Lake Nippenicket. But this lake mysteriously disappeared by the turn of the century. The spot where Fowling Pond was is located on King Philip's Street in Raynham is now a tract of land known as Pine Swamp. In the 1939,  CCC workers witnessed an enormous black snake that did not look indigenous to the area. Photo courtesy of the Old Colony Historical Society. All rights reserved.
Although Fowling Pond was the same size as nearby Lake Nip, this lake disappeared in less than a hundred years. By 1800, only small remnants of the pond remained. By the turn of the century, it had completely dried up to a swath of land known as Pine Swamp on King Philip's Street. In 1840, the following was included in a book called "Historical Collections of Massachusetts" by John Barber: "Fowling Pond, is itself a great curiosity. Before Philips' war it seems to have been a large pond, nearly two miles long and three quarters of a mile wide. Since then, the water is almost gone, and the large tract it once covered is grown up to a thick-set swamp of cedar and pine. That this, however, was once a large pond, haunted by fowls, and supplied with fish in great plenty, is more than probable, for here is found, upon dry land, a large quantity of white floor sand, and a great number of smooth stones, which are never found except on shores or places long washed by water."


"What could induce Philip to build his house here? It was undoubtedly, fishing and fowling, in this, then large pond. But more than than all, there is yet living in this town a man of more than ninety years old, who can well remember, than when he was a boy, he had frequently gone off in a canoe to fish in this pond; and says, that many a fish had been catched, where the pines and cedars are now more than fifty feet high. If an instance, at once so rare, and well attested, as this, should not be admitted as a curious scrap of the natural history of this country; yet it must be admitted as a strong analogical proof, that many of our swamps were originally ponds of water: but more than this, it suggests a new argument in the favor of the wisdom and goodness of that Diving Providence, which "changes the face of the earth," to supply the wants of man, as often as he changes from uncivilized nature, to a state of cultivation and refinement." (Collections of the The Massachusetts Historical Society.)


Carolyn Owen, former Old Colony Historical Society Archivist speculated on the mysterious disappearance: “Perhaps a great storm cut a swath through the embankment and drained the pond, it is one of nature’s curiosities where once King Philip rested and summered on the banks of a beautiful body of water and the tribe stocked to food to last through the long cold months ahead, there is now nothing left but the tall trees rising from a murky swamp.”


It is interesting to explore the connection between the location of the CCC worker's sighting of the monster snake and what that area was: A place King Philip called home. I personally have never heard of a disappearing lake. But if one was going to disappear, I am not surprised it vanished in the Bridgewater Triangle.

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Small Towns, Big Murders: Bizarre Crimes of the Bridgewaters



This is a photo of an actual grave of one of the Bridgewater Triangle's many murder victims.

It was late on a cold Monday night in February, 2010 at the Bridgewater police station. And here in this quiet New England town, the scene looked more like a page out of a Stephen King novel than a Monday night at a small town police station.

A man's face was smeared with blood, as were his hands. His clothes were drenched a deep crimson. "Do you need medical attention?" The police officers asked him. "No." The man answered quietly. "The blood is not mine."

Earlier that night, 41-year old Brian Bellamy smashed a hammer through a window of his estranged wife's parents home and headed up the stairs possessed with rage. Bellamy's two year-old son was sleeping next to his wife, but that did not deter him from his evil and dastardly deed. Bellamy started bludgeoning his wife with the hammer. Hard, violent blows to her face and neck. Blood splattered everywhere, dripping from the bed and onto the floor. Next Bellamy took his hands and wrapped them around her small neck and began the squeeze.

When the victim's father tried to stop him, Bellamy started to strangle his father-in-law as well. That's when the Bridgewater police arrived, just in time. The victim's mother had called 911 at the beginning of the crime. Luckily, the woman survived.

This was certainly not the first bludgeoning or crime of passion involving an attack on a family member in Bridgewater, a town that has a dark history of madness and murder. Behind the veils of this beautiful college town, lies a sinister and mysterious history of brutal matricides and parricides, spousal arguments that lead to murder and then suicide. The patterns of violent domestic disputes goes on to this very day, according the Bridgewater Police Twitter page. It is not hard to notice the patterns of high call volume in responses to domestic disturbances among family members.


"WE HAVE GOT TO DIE," 1909


At 4 a.m. on August 22 in West Bridgewater, Marianio Janeiro entered the bedroom  where his wife lay in bed, her tiny infant child asleep next to her. Marianio  had just bathed, shaved and  dressed in his finest clothes.

The poor woman was  probably wondering where her husband was going, all dressed up at 4 o'clock in the morning. But if she was going to ask him where he was off to,  she never had the chance to ask him. 

 "This is the last of you and me; We have got to die," Marianio said to his wife. Then he took a revolver and shot her in the head. "The bullet entered her head back of the left ear and left an ugly wound. After shooting his wife he held the pistol to his head and fired the second shot just above the right ear and fell dead instantly."

The baby was unharmed. Although she did sustain critical injured,  Mrs. Janeiro survived the attempted to murder to the best of this writer's knowledge.


THE MURDER OF THE STURTEVANTS, 1874


Seven miles from the Bridgewater Depot in nearby Halifax, "during the peaceful quiet of a Sabbath evening, one of the foulest and most unnatural murders that ever stained the criminal actual. of any locality, had been perpetrated. Three aged persons, the inmates of the same home, whose lives had been passed in plodding industry, and whose history was as uneventful as human experience can be, were suddenly involved in as dark a tragedy as the mind of man can conceive, and in the midst of it hurried out of existence."

The Sturtevant House

 On February 15, 1874, three elderly people were brutally beaten to death with a sharp cart spike. A neighbor found what was left of them the following day. The crime scene had the even the toughest police officer shaken. "The three aged occupants of that house were found cruelly murdered, their heads pounded, to a jelly. Thomas and Simeon, the two brothers, within the house that should have sheltered them, and Miss Mary Buckley, the housekeeper, outside, though almost within its very shadow." The triple murder of two brothers and their housekeeper had locals of the Bridgewater area living in terror--until police arrested the crazed murderer, William E. Sturtevant, the very nephew of the victims.

William was murder suspect number one and reportedly confessed because of a parrot. (Yes, a parrot.) Mary Buckley had a pet parrot named Captain Kidd. When police brought William to the crime scene, Captain Kidd shrieked "Murderer, Murderer!" and then made the sound of death rattle. The parroting the likely last words of Mary Buckley was simply too much for William, who caved and confessed right there.

The house where the murder took place is rumored to be haunted. Not far from the house is the cemetery where Simeon and Thomas Sturtevant are buried. Their gravestones read "MURDERED" across them. The murderer, William Sturtevant was buried in the same cemetery in a secret burial conducted under the cloak of night after he was executed by hanging for his dark deeds to his two elderly uncles and his cousin, their housekeeper.


In the 1980s, a local newspaper ran a story about the grisly history of the Sturtevant House. The reporter interviewed the current occupant, a Bridgewater State College professor at the time. Although the man claimed not be a man of "superstition" and refused to accept the local stories that the house was haunted, he finally found himself succumb to the fact that something was indeed in the house. "The house has a powerful presence....the house makes noises. footsteps, breaking, heavy breathing. I never see anything, but I think that someone is there."



"Several times we have had people over and when they got up to leave, the door swung open. The door to the upstairs attic kept coming unlatched and banging. I kept closing it, but it kept opening, even though there was no wind."


 THE "BRIDGEWATER MURDER,"1879


A fight over potatoes on September 24th, led to the bloody massacre of Henry Gunn, at the hands of his own son Justin, who attacked his father with both a screwdriver and  hatchet. The Boston papers reported that the victims "brains were dashed while he slept" with "two hideous wounds to the head." Justin Gunn was not remorseful for the crime at all when apprehended by Bridgewater police a few weeks after the crime. In Gunn's confession to the police, Justin was oddly calm and in complete control when he described the horrific events that occurred on September 24, 1879. After his father scolded him over his son's error in putting wet potatoes in the root cellar, Justin Gunn claimed that his father "knocked him down." Gunn went on to say in his confession: "I got up, reached to the mantle piece and took a small screwdriver about the size of my finger, but about two feet long and struck him with it but he got the best of me and pounded me good. I was wild for revenge. As he rested on the edge of the bed, I went out of the dining room into the passage way and took a hatchet which I had found there and came back to the room where he was. Holding the hatchet--a heavy one--in my left hand...I went to the front of father and when I got past I turned and struck him the head with it, using both hands and knocking him so that his head fell toward the head of the bed on which he was sitting. I struck him three or four times. He fell off of the bed. I picked him and and laid him on it again, he made not noise at all."


MODERN DAY PSYCHO, 2002

One of the most recent murder within a family in the Bridgewaters  occurred on December 15, 2002, when George Nardi, living with his mother, Dianne Barchard on Goodwin Street in East Bridgewater, killed her in a fit of rage when she refused to make him dinner that night. The murder weapon were Nardi's bare hands with which he smothered her to death. Immediately after the crime, Nardi left a chilling voice mail for his brother. It was of Nardi laughing insanely, then finally saying, "You're not going to be able to spend Christmas with mom this year." Norman Bates-style, Nardi lived with the rotting corpse of his mother for over two weeks. Prosecutors reported that Barchard's "bloody corpse was found Monday covered with an afghan in the bedroom of their apartment."

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The Bridgewater Triangle's Freaky Little Waterman's Bird Farm






Bob Waterman's unique brand of advertising stands on the side of the road off of Route 105 in Halifax.

Not paranormal--but far from normal--is a freaky little farm tucked away on Old Summit Street in Halifax, right off of haunted route 105. There are signs everywhere leading the way. They want you to come. The signs pointing to the farm are adorned with eye catching decorations like plastic snowmen and Santa Clauses. You follow the weathered signs and you arrive at what looks to be at first glance a place that's half Pee Wee's Playhouse and half house of horrors. 

 


 
Dirty stuffed animals and dolls dangle by their necks from trees. Old spring rocking horses are everywhere. You ask yourself, what the hell is this place?   You feel like you are trespassing into the mind of a madman. You suddenly get the feeling you shouldn't be here. That's when the cutest old man welcomes you to his farm and asks you if you would like to see the birds. He takes you beyond the gates of the farm and now you see that the place is huge. And the whole place is decorated very much like the front yard. More 70's rocking horses. More children's toys. More Christmas decor...more Santas. One dangles from a rope about 30 feet up in a tree over a small pond. Santa is just inches from submersion. You are now feeling very much like you are in a Fellini movie. Bob Waterman points at the Santa with glee. "See my Santa?" he says with a wonderful laugh. "That's how I churn the pond in the winter to keep it from freezing. So the ducks have a place to drink from."

There are old Christmas trees everywhere, giving the birds a place to perch. Bob tells me that Nesarella's Farm in Halifax gives him the trees, the leftover's from the Christmas season. There is a heaping pile of bread for the hundreds of birds here at Waterman's Bird Farm. Stop and Shop in Halifax donates the bread.
You are feeling completely overwhelmed from sensory overload. You never knew that birds could be so interesting and beautiful. And they are everywhere. Fluffy ones that look like cats. Chickens that look like they are walking on stilts. Babies and protective mothers. Eggs waiting to hatch. A peacock spreads its feathers six feet wide and it makes you gasp with its beauty. Now you are feeling very lucky to have followed the signs to Waterman's Bird Farm, because this is quite a unique experience.
 
 
 
You tell Bob Waterman that this place is so special that he could charge admission. With a wave of his hand, he says, "Nah...I do it for the children." Then he tells you that he collects toys at yard sales and uses them to decorate the bird farm for kids. Awwww...you want to adopt this guy. What looked creepy and eerie when you pulled up suddenly looks magical...when you see it through Bob Waterman's eyes. Waterman's Bird Farm. Check it out!
 
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Bridgewater Police Decaputate 6-foot Black Racer Snake, Posed To Strike...On Strange Date!


On June 24, 2010--the exact date that marks the outbreak of King Philip's War--a carpenter got the surprise of his life when he approached the front door of a client's house to find a six foot Black Racer snake...three feet in the air and positioned to strike.

Black Racer snakes aren't exactly out of place in Massachusetts, but seeing one would certainly be a rare occurrence. Black Racers live in forests, wetlands and fields. They are shy reptiles that typically slither slowly away from contact with humans, unless provoked or cornered.

According to The Brockton Enterprise, "Mark Fitton turned to go back into the house on Lady Slipper Road and take out the last load of material after finishing a kitchen remodeling job.

He put one foot up on the stairs leading from the garage to the entryway, let out a yell and jumped back.

On the steps was a 6-foot snake, a black racer, standing 3 feet in the air, shaking its tail and darting upward toward Fitton’s head. Fitton is afraid of wasps and hornets, so his boss, Geoffrey Bassett, thought that’s what had startled him.

“Mark, cut it out,” he told him.

But when he saw the reptile, he quit teasing and called animal control.

It took about eight minutes for police to respond to the home on the far east side of town.

The snake had by that time fled the garage and hid in a nearby bush.

Out of fear for the four children living in the house, Bassett said, the three men decided to kill the snake.

Basset said the officer used a 6-foot angle iron, an L-shaped metal bar used in construction, that they found in the garage to knock the snake out of the bush. He then hit it several times with the bar until the head dangled from the body. Using a hand saw to remove the head, the men placed the carcass in a construction bag and put the bag in the trunk of the police cruiser."
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