Showing posts with label Downright Bizarre Bridgewater Triangle Events. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Downright Bizarre Bridgewater Triangle Events. Show all posts

Freetown Forest: Unidentified Floating Objects Descend From The Sky In 1942

"None of the witnesses saw any "human forms," and one witness suggested perhaps it was parts of a plane that fell to the ground. But no plane parts were found. "None of the citizens reporting to police were certain that the objects floating down were human, but they were certain that "something" had descended over the Freetown and Assonet areas."

What fell from the skies over Freetown Forest on the night of November 4, 1942? I don't know. And neither did the witnesses who saw the "objects" descending from the sky and down into the forest that night, nor did the police who investigated the incident. After receiving four separate reports that night from nervous citizens who witnessed the event, police took the indent very seriously. 

Some witness described the objects as looking like parachutes. And why wouldn't they? It was the dawn of World War II and anything suspicious would certainly be percieved as relating to the war. It isn't unlikely that those scared citizens believed the Germans had started their invasion of Bristol County!

None of the witnesses saw any "human forms," and one witness suggested perhaps it was parts of a plane that fell to the ground. But no plane parts were found. "None of the citizens reporting to police were certain that the objects floating down were human, but they were certain that "something" had descended over the Freetown and Assonet areas."

Sargent Michael Ryan was on duty on Brightman Bridge in Fall River that night, when he was approached by two separate individuals, at two different times. The two witnesses' stories were almost identical. Patrolman Michael Hart was stationed at the other side of town when someone approached him with the same story. By the time an anonymous call came into the station, police were already on alert. 

Authorites searched the woods and found nothing. They contacted the Army who assured them they were not involved in the incident in any way. The mystery was never solved. It is just another page in the open book of the Bridgewater Triangle.

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Bridgewater Triangle Alligators: Eight Gator Sightings Documented By Newspapers



An alligator in Brockton is captured by a local firefighter in the summer of
2010 after it is seen crossing a residential street. 

1. July, 1929. Abington
A five-foot long alligator is seen “roaming about wherever he chooses and devouring whatever appeals to his taste." The gator is not captured.

2. March, 2005. Rehoboth 
A local boy encountered two alligators. He kills one, while the other gets away. The second reptile is never found.

3. July, 2005, Middleboro
A 5-foot alligator is found in Stump Pond in Middleboro. Police lure the creature out of the water with a chicken as bait. 

3. July, 2005, Brockton
A 4 ½ foot alligator makes an appearance at D.W. Field Park in Brockton. After a small chase, police are able to capture the gator.

4. August, 2005, Brockton
A second alligator is spotted at D.W. Field Park in Brockton.

5. September, 2005. Abington
A five-foot long alligator takes up residence at Island Grove pond. The creature is not caught.

6. May, 2010. Brockton. 
Yet another rash of alligator sightings at D.W. Field Park. The gator is not found.

7. July, 2010. Middleboro 
A fisherman in Middleboro catches a 2-foot long baby alligator out of the Nemasket River and brings it to the nearby State Police barracks.

8. August, 2010
A Brockton firefighter on his way to work one morning spots a 3-foot alligator crossing the street. The alligator is wearing a leather spiked collar and is dragging behind him a leash. The firefighter swiftly captures the gator.









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Top Ten Oddities of the Bridgewater Triangle

The "Human Skeleton," Isaac Sprague, hailed from the Bridgewater Triangle.

1. The longest epitaph in the United States is located in a Rehoboth cemetery



2. Three P.T. Barnham circus "freaks" hailed from here, including Middleboro's Tom Thumb and East Bridgewater's "The Human Skeleton" 



3. The first boundary line in the United States is located in Abington at the Bridgewater Triangle’s furthest most delineated northern map point.



4. In the summer of 2014, a beluga whale--a species usually found in the arctic--was spotted in the Bridgewater Triangle making its way down the Taunton River. Soon after, the whale would be followed by the world's second largest shark species, for a basking shark was seen and caught on video in the same exact river.


5. In 1906, bones of “a giant” were discovered in Middleboro


6. Alligators, seals, emu, peacocks, cow moose, bears, Africal Sevral, panthers and mountain lions have all been found in the Bridgewater Triangle


7. There are both hand prints and footprints embedded into several Bridgewater Triangle boulders; hand prints and a footprint in Middleboro, footprints in Norton


8. Dighton Rock is the first documented petroglyph in the United States


9. The chocolate chip cookie was invented in the happiest of accidents in the northern apex of the Bridgewater Triangle


10. The Bridgewater Triangle is host to the world's only shovel museum, located in Easton






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The Surpising Truth About Who First Carved Into "The Bridgewater Triangle Explorer's Tree:" An Interview With the Bridgewater Triangle's own, Horror Writer James Michael Rice



Early on in my exploration of the Bridgewater Triangle, I spent a lot of time with one Joseph DeAndrade, Bridgewater Triangle researcher and alleged Bridgewater Triangle Bigfoot witness. DeAndreade and I spent hours talking on the phone about his experiences hunting for Bigfoot and discussing our theories on this strange area where we live. We took many hikes through Hockomock Swamp. One day, he said he wanted to show me something very special: "The Bridgewater Triangle Explorer's Tree." The tree is located off the Elm Street Hockomock Swamp path and for all means, is hidden in the middle of nowhere.

It took us two trips back to the swamp to find it, but we did (with the help of a helpful young man who knew that area of the swamp like the back of his hand.) So there we were...at the tree. The over-sized Beech Tree was covered in carvings. The two most profound carving being "Welcome to the Triangle" and another, a very creepy looking carving that simply read "HIRE THE NIGHTMARES."




Joe had carved his name in years ago, so he took out his switchblade and passed it to me and I went to work carving my own name into the Explorer's Tree. Now I was immortalized! (Until the tree died, anyway. FLASH FORWARD SIX YEARS...
Now nothing that happens in the Bridgewater Triangle surprises me. The nature the beast of  the Bridgewater Triangle is simply this: "Expect the unexpected." A car collides with a cow on Route 105 in Middleboro,  and as the driver is trying to get her bearings, she hears "MOOOO!" from the backseat, the cow just sitting there, unscathed...yep, not surprised. A person is killed when they are struck by an owl in broad daylight? Mmmhmm. Baby seals swimming in the rivers of East Bridgewater and Middleboro. Not a problem. Five alligator sightings in the triangle in the span of four months? Totally acceptable. But whenever I was contacted by horror writer, James Michael Rice, author of such books as "Rebel Angels" and "A Tough Act To Follow" I simply didn't believe what he had to say.
There was no way this guy could be telling the truth. That he had seen my pictures of "The Bridgewater Triangle Tree" and he was the original carver. It was last February when I found this message in my facebook inbox:  "I don't know whether to laugh or cry. How on earth did you stumble upon that tree with "Hire the Nightmares" carved on it? I carved that and I think "Welcome to the Triangle" back in the late 80s/early 90s. My friends and I had our own paranormal investigation group when we were about twelve years-old (circa 1986). Most of us lived on Elm Street, therefore we called ourselves "The Nightmares."

Then this guy tells me that his experiences growing up on Elm Street helped shape him into becoming a writer. And that he has written three books that were all in part influenced by his childhood. I was in total disbelief for the first time. That this could be true...that this tree in the middle of nowhere which took much effort to find, just happened to be originally carved by this random guy facebooking me. And he happens to have written books that deal with Bridgewater Triangle themes such as hauntings, murders, suicide and mysterious disappearances. At first it was seemed too far fetched to believe. Then I remembered: it's the Bridgewater Triangle, the land of strange accidents and coincidences. I started to believe.


I recently interviewed James Michael Rice to dig a little deeper into what it was like to grow up on Elm Street, a fact that undoubtedly shaped him into becoming a horror writer he is today.

Q. What are some are some themes in your books that reflect themes of the Bridgewater Triangle?
A. Some of the darker themes include hauntings, murders, suicides, unexplained disappearances. A little bit of the history and lore of the swamp trickles into each book, however briefly, even if it is not the focus of the story. For example, when I was a kid, my friends and I found a lone stick poking up from the ice of a shallow pond on Elm Street. It looked like a skeletal hand, with gnarled fingers. I always thought that was creepy, and the image stuck with me. In "Rebel Angels", the killer hides his victims in a mysterious pool in the Hockomock. He hears voices coming from the pool, telling him he is doing God's work, and that It wants him to keep feeding It more souls. Later, in a novella titled "The Still", the reader gets to see what's beneath the surface of that pool, and it's definitely not God.

Q.  How many books have you written to date?
A. I've written four books to date and two screenplays. My first book was “Rebel Angels,” a story that came to me when I was twelve-years old and never left me. “Rebel Angels” is about a group of kids who unwittingly cross paths with a serial killer, and are then framed for murder the killer’s most recent victim. Hunted by the police, FBI, and the killer himself, the friends take refuge in a remote cabin in New Hampshire, where they must find a way to survive until they can clear their names of the crime. My second novel is called A Tough Act to Follow (soon to be released on Kindle). For this book, I took a step back from the horror genre, and wrote a coming-of-age story based in the fictional town of Rainbridge, Massachusetts. The story follows a group of friends as they move from junior high to high school, from high school to college and beyond, illustrating that strange mix of wide-eyed optimism and hopeless uncertainty we all face during the transition from childhood to adulthood.


The third book is a collection of short stories called, “The Still.” Most of the stories were written when I was in sixth or seventh grade. In a way, each story connects to the other. It was not meant as a companion piece to "Rebel Angels," although it does connect to several of the characters.

Q. What was special about the woods you explored as a child?
A. To me, the woods of Hockomock Swamp were as deep and full of mystery as any jungle on earth. My brother and I spent most of our time exploring those woods, discovering little trails, hidden streams, and ferny groves; it was easy to think we were the first to ever lay eyes on these places.

Q. At what age did you first realize that you were living in an area where anything could happen? Did you experience anything “unexplainable” before you heard of the “Bridgewater Triangle,” or did you rather learn about the Bridgewater Triangle and then start investigating?
 A. The neighborhood kids often talked about feeling watched in the swamp, and hearing something bulling through the forest, knocking down trees. We'd also heard of people actually hearing loud, bloodcurdling screams. It wasn't until I was maybe ten or eleven that some friends and I experienced these things for ourselves...along with a whole slew of other phenomenon: disembodied voices, trees being "thrown" at us while deep in the woods, what looked like large human footprints in the corn fields, ghostly forms, strange lights, a strange squeaking sound that seemed to be coming from a plastic toy (a Native American head), that seemed to respond to questions and things we were saying), cult activity, you name it. This was a few years before PM Magazine aired an episode on something we'd never heard of..."The Bridgewater Triangle" on Halloween, featuring Loren Coleman. I still have an old copy of that episode somewhere

Q. That toy Indian head sounds interesting, please tell me more about that.
A. I don't know where the Indian head toy came from; probably something my dad, an avid collector of anything antique, picked up from a yard sale at some point. My friend and I were in my basement when we heard the sound. I cannot remember what type of questions we asked it (I'm guessing I was only ten or eleven at the time), but it was probably something along the lines of "Is there someone here with us?" and the squeaking would intensify. We didn't know it was coming from the toy at first. When we traced the sound to the toy, we thought maybe there was a mouse inside of it, because the head was hollow and stuffed with old newspaper. We took the newspaper out and it was empty. Then it squeaked! We both freaked out and tossed it out the window, into my backyard. It was quiet for a little while but then the sound came again, so we picked it up and hurled it into the woods behind my house. The was the last I ever saw of it. But the story doesn't end there. I didn't find out this next part until this past summer. My older brother and I were talking about some bizarre things that happened to us during our childhood, and he mentioned a séance he'd had with some friends when he was a teenager. I vaguely remembered coming home with my parents, who were alarmed to find the house empty, with all the lights on and the doors all left open, with no sign of my brother. Well, here's the part I didn't know: While having a séance with a Ouija board, my brother and his friends began hearing a loud squeak that responded to their questions. It scared them so much that they all took of running! My brother never knew about the Indian head and my similar experience with the squeaking sound, so we both just looked at each other, same to say: "Yes, that's Elm Street, all right!"

Q. Tell me about the “The Nightmares.”
A. "The Nightmares" is a reference to "A Nightmare on Elm Street," which was released around that time. My friends and I called ourselves "The Nightmares" because we were really into all the unexplained, scary things the swamp had to offer. At the time we carved that tree, I believe it was a blank slate, no other carvings on it whatsoever. I think we were just bored one day, and decided to go wandering. We carved "Welcome to the Triangle", and "Hire the Nightmares", and a few other things. We were probably thirteen or fourteen at the time, and I guess some part of us hoped someone would call us if he or she experienced something unexplainable, so we could go in and investigate it. So many people have written about the swamp, but many of those authors, talented as they may be, have never even "experienced" the swamp. Well, my childhood was filled with experiences, and I guess that's why we wanted to leave our mark there, to let others know they were not alone.

Q. At what age did you start writing and were they all horror stories?
A. I owe my love of writing to comic books, the old Marvel and DC stories. I started writing and drawing comic books when I was in fourth grade, and once I read some Stephen King short stories, that sealed the deal for me. Besides horror, I dabbled in action, thrillers, sci-fi, drama, etc.

Q. Tell me about some of the strange things you saw and found as a child living on one the most infamous streets in the Bridgewater Triangle.
A. Some of the more memorable things I experienced include: a man in a full ninja costume out in the swamp, the gathering of a cult in the blueberry fields one Halloween (we found a burnt cross and other evidence the following day), shrill screams coming from the swamp, ghost lights, unexplained voices, a nebulous glowing shape that seemed to gather energy enough to take a human-like form before it eventually winked out. The list goes on and on.

Q. Tell me about the screenplay you wrote about the swamp.
A. "The Curse of the Hockomock Swamp" is the story of a man named Jesse who receives a call from an old friend who still lives in Bridgewater. One of their childhood friends has gone missing (we later learn this is the second of their friends to have gone missing in the swamp) and the man reluctantly returns to Bridgewater to help find him. Once there, he visits with his old "friend" Doctor Harrington, a psychiatrist who operates the local asylum. While talking to his former psychiatrist, the man recalls the traumatic events of his past...growing up in Bridgewater, run-ins with local bullies, and more importantly, the discovery of an ancient tomb in the swamp, which contained strange pictographs and a single skull placed atop a stone alter. Well, one of Jesse's friends stole the skull, thinking it might be valuable, and as soon as they exit the swamp, it unleashes a terrible curse that takes possession of their friend... and eventually the entire neighborhood. I don't want to give away too much of the story, but the boys ultimately realize they must bring the skull back to its proper resting place... but the skull doesn't want to go back. Think "Excorcist" meets "Stand By Me."

For more information on James Michael Rice or to order his books in paperback or kindle version, please click here for Amazon. http://www.amazon.com/James-Michael-Rice/e/B003SCGSRG




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The Swansea Roof Raiser of 1942


In April of 1942, a freak tornado dropped into the town of Swansea, causing almost NO damage. Affecting only a pavilion roof in its wake, what it did with the roof is nothing short of BIZARRE. The short- lived and weak stamina tornado was reported to have path of not more than 300 yards. 
The five-ton wooden roof--measuring 65 x 20 feet--was carried "light as a feather high above the tree tops for 450 feet and then gently deposited intact..." ON IT'S OWNER"S LAWN! Witnesses claimed to have seen the wooden roof lifted vertically off the pavilion about 100 feet in the air before it "sailed" over a pasture. "It seemed to be held in air, they said, by an inverted cone of dust." The owner of the pavilion witnessed the entire event. She claimed the roof "sailed over the pasture travelling 200 feet, then circled back and passed over the roof of their house and came to rest on the lawn."

"Witnesses said the wooden roof was lifted almost vertically about 100 feet and sailed quickly over a pasture...John Valley, who was in the pasture when the tornado passed him by, said he tried to run, believing the roof might fall on him, but seemed to be rooted to one spot."


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The Twisted Roads of The Bridgewater Triangle

Many of the "otherworldly" encounters people experience in Bridgewater Triangle happen on dark, wooded country roads. My very unique first experience of the Bridgewater Triangle happened on the midnight-darkened roads of Bridgewater, Middleboro and Lakeville. I knew nothing about the Bridgewater Triangle at the time.


It was 1989. I was living in Hanson and a new friend from Bridgewater and I went to movies in Brockton. I dropped her off around 11:45 and she gave me directions to the only gas station that was open, as I had just realized I was on empty. After driving for about 25 minutes I knew I was lost. Dreadfully lost. And was about to run out of gas at any second. I had no idea where I was, let alone where the gas station was. It was just one dark street after another. I looked at the gas gauge and now I was below empty. My heart was pounding and fear started seizing me. No payphones in sight. In the middle of nowhere. That is where my car was going to run out of gas.

Twenty-five minutes turned into an hour. And I had never been so scared in my life. Any second, this car was going to stall on one of these pitch black roads. I was running on fumes. The car slowed, but kept going. It was like I was being gently propelled along. I started praying Hail Mary’s to calm me. I must have said five hundred of them.

After one o'clock in the morning, I finally came to a road I recognized. Route, 18. I was in Lakeville, a town which I had never been to, but I had heard of. I started heading north to Whitman, which was about 20 miles away. From Whitman to my house, another seven or so.

I passed several gas stations, but they were all closed. I had no idea how my car was still going after all this time and all these miles. Adrenal rushing though me. Forty minutes later I was on my street, and then my car finally quit. I took my foot of the gas and let the car glide on its own. I rolled into my driveway and the car finally came to a complete stop: in my parking spot.
I
 always attributed my little miracle to my prayers. But maybe something else heard my pleas for help that night. When I first learned of the Bridgewater Triangle about five years ago, my unexplainable experience that night in 1989 instantly came to mind. I have never heard of a POSITIVE bizarre experience like mine, but it happened. It happened to me. What happened to me simply defied physics. Something was protecting me and got me home safe that night. I felt it and knew it. But most people's experiences on the dark, wooded roads of the Bridgewater Triangle are anything but positive. Sometimes just "odd", these encounters are often times terrifying.

THE MOST FAMOUS ROAD GHOST OF THEM ALL: THE RED HEADED HITCHHIKER OF ROUTE 44


Experiences with roadside ghosts are a common theme in the Bridgewater Triangle. The most famous of all of these is the Red Headed Hitchhiker of Route 44, made famous by the local legends recorded by Rehoboth historian Charles Turek Robinson in his folklore cult classic, "New England Ghost Files."  This menacing spirit is said to haunt the stretch of road of Route 44 at the Rehoboth/Seekonk town line. The ghost is said to have red hair, a beard, wears a red flannel shirt, has a “maniacal” laugh…and really, really likes messing with people.

The first red headed hitchhiker story dates back to 1969 and the legends span to the 1980s. My favorite red headed hitchhiker story happened in 1984. A local couple’s car broke down. The man told his wife to stay in the car while he tried to find a pay phone to call AAA. “I was hoping to find a house with a light on,” the man said.

“Suddenly I saw a man sitting on the side of the road. He was a sloppy looking guy, with red messy hair.” The man asked the stranger if he knew where the closest pay phone was. The stranger did not answer. The man asked him again, and again…and again. And still no answer. He just looked at the man with an odd grin. So the man asks the stranger if he is okay. The man said in Robinson’s book, “Suddenly, the man’s face got very strange. He stopped grinning, he twisted his mouth and I noticed that there was something wrong with his eyes. They were all clouded over--no pupils or anything--and all white.”

The man runs back to towards the car only to hear this crazy laughter behind him. He turns and looks and the guy is gone, but the laughing is still really loud, like he is still behind him. But the story gets weirder. When the guy gets back to his car he finds his wife standing outside of it, scared out of her mind. Apparently she had turned on the car radio while she was sitting there waiting when suddenly a creepy voice cut right through the song that was playing. It started taunting her, calling her by her name…and laughing hysterically.

Maybe the red headed hitchhiker finally caught a lift, because there have been no legitimate sightings since those stories initially laid out by Robinson. But the red headed hitchhiker isn't the only game in ghost town. Phantoms come in all shapes in forms in these stories of some older and some more recent tales of roadside encounters with ghosts. Some of these stories come from websites such as Cellar Walls by Chris Pittman and Ghosts of America. Others come from books such as Christopher Balzano's "Ghost of The Bridgewater Triangle" and Charles Turek Robinson's "New England Ghost Files." Some are first hand accounts. But they all happened on a dark wooded road at night. And I know first hand how terrifying it can be to  drive those roads. I can't imagine seeing what these people reported seeing on one of those roads the night I should have run out of gas. I can't imagine their terror and what had to be immense confusion and fear at what they were seeing before their very eyes.

GHOSTLY ROAD RAGE

This story is so spooky, it sounds like an urban legend told to warn young teens not to stay out too late at night. A teenage girl takes a shortcut down a very dark country road late one night on the way home from her boyfriend's house. And is terrorized by a team of road ghosts.
"It happened to me in 1967. I was 16. I was taking a short cut from my boyfriend's house in Easton through East Bridgewater on a very dark wooded road on my way home to Weymouth. It was a Friday night. Just before I turned down the road which only had one street light at the time, there was a car behind me taunting me. They sped around me and went ahead of me. Later I got a creepy thought that they might ambush me in the middle of the wooded road.
I put the creepy thought out of my mind. But as I got to the one street light in the middle of the dark wooded road. There they were... a line of them on the street holding their arms up and intentionally waiting for me, blocking my path. I was horrified that what I had just imagined was actually happening to me. My foot slipped off the clutch and the car began to buck. I screamed a bloodcurdling scream that hurt my ears. Then a moment of self preservation kicked in just before the car stalled, I stepped down on the clutch and drove straight through them...literally.

Weird thing is, they did not let go or move out of my way. I clearly drove through them as them they were not there. I really did experience this. It felt so dark and frightening that I buried this experience and didn't tell anyone. I thought people would think I was crazy. Could someone please tell me why this happened? I felt like ghosts were trying to trap me there out in the woods on that dark night... It was horrifying to a young girl at 16.
I don't even know why I didn't tell anyone. Many years later I was dating this guy on the cape who started telling me about a friend of his who was with his girlfriend kissing in their car one night that someone had picked up the car and started shaking the car....I was listening to the story and all of a sudden wreaked and remembered what had happened to me that night long ago.I couldn't believe he was telling me this story. It had happened near the area where I had my horrible experience." www.ghostsofamerica.com.

PRISON DEMON

A mother and daughter are driving in the prison complex when suddenly they see that the road in insurpassable: a pine tree is down in the middle of the road. But as they get closer they see that this is not a fallen tree, but rather a living tree bent from the weight of a black winged creature standing on the top of it, causing the unnatural bending of the pine.

One Saturday afternoon a mother a daughter were driving in the Bridgewater Correctional Complex. What they saw that day will haunt them for the rest of their lives. Out of all the stories of the Bridgewater Triangle, this one has to be up there on the list of the most disturbing and bizarre. The first thing that they noticed as they approached "the thing" was a pine tree completely bent to the ground in the middle of the street. As they neared closer they saw what was causing such an unnatural occurrence. It was a black, man-like being with huge bat-like wings standing on the top of the tree that was now on the street. The mother described it as looking like "a tall man hunched down a bit, in a skintight black suit with large and almost bat type wings. He was standing, but hunched down, on the pine tree, his weight was holding down the top. He saw us and we looked at each other for just a few minutes then he straightened, leaped and flew over the top of the trees on the other side of the road. The pine tree he had been standing on, bounced back up slowly, and rocked back and forth a few times before stopping in its normal standing position. That was all we saw."www.cellarwalls.com

GHOST RIDERS

On more than one occasion, apparitions have been seen riding spectral bicycles on the roads of the Bridgewater Triangle. These next two stories happened on different routes, but both happened in the same general vicinity.  One happened on Route 106 in Halifax, the other not far on Route 105 in Middleboro.

Carlston Wood is a paranormal investigator who grew up in Bridgewater. More than once, the ghost of a a a bicycle riding on route 105 in Middleboro has appeared to him. Wood describes the apparition as appearing to be a young teenage girl wearing clothing that looks like they are from the 1950s. She is riding a bike from same era. 

Wood has witnessed the apparition three times and all three times his car was the only one on the road at the time. All three times the conditions were the same: very dark and cloudy and in the dead of winter when the temperature is at freezing. "Over the course of many years I have seen girl on the bike three times but I have never stopped the car and ventured outside. Each time she peddles by on the opposite side of the street and looks straight ahead. Looking into the rear view mirrors the girl passes she fades away as quickly as she materializes."

Recently, Wood who is also a musician was in Raynham. After a band set, Wood got to talking with two fans, a local married couple. Somehow the story of the ghostly biker of route 105 came up and the girl turned to her husband, jaw dropped. The couple had seen the ghost before too and were shocked that someone else had witnessed this creepy apparition. "He saw it too!" The wife exclaimed.

Last summer, a local couple was traveling down route 106 in Halifax, which joins Route 105 where Carlston Wood had his experiences. The wife was busy texting and wasn't paying attention to the road when suddenly her husband pulled the car over.. She looked over at her husband who looked terrified. She was perplexed as to what had transpired in the last few seconds. At first the husband said nothing. After about thirty seconds he turned to her and told her he just "saw a ghost on a bike." He claimed the ghost and the bicycle were all white. Then drove across the route 106 and simply vanished.


THE MAD TRUCKER OF COPICUT ROAD

The legend is that the ghost of a mad truck driver has terrorized drivers of this dark road at night.

"I recently visited Copicut Woods and my friends and I drove through. There wasn't much that we experienced except the whole time, I had a strange, uneasy feeling. When we reached the end of the dirt road, we noticed that there were these bright blue headlights behind us. It looked as though they were coming from a huge truck. My friend mentioned how it looked like a Mack truck or something because it seemed so big. He said that it looked like it had orange lights on the top of it, which I didn't see. What was funny and creepy about the whole thing was that it wasn't behind us the whole time and as soon as it was behind us, it pretty much vanished. There wasn't a place for a car to pull over unless it pulled into a driveway at the end of the forest. The really weird thing was that we couldn't find our way to the road to get home, so when we turned around to go back through the path, we didn't see any large vehicle anywhere...in a driveway or anywhere in the woods. I researched about the woods and the mysterious lights the next day, which led me to this site. I was curious to know if anyone had any similar experiences or knew anything about it because it scared me."
www.cellarwalls.com


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Bridgewater Triangle Monster Snakes & Vanishing Lakes



Civil Conservation Corps (CCC) workers clear a swamp.


"Huge mystery snakes have been sighted before in the Hockomock region. In 1939, Roosevelt-era CCC workers, completing a project on King Philip's Street at the edge of the swamp, reported seeing a huge snake as large around and black as a stove-pipe.' The snake coiled for a moment, raised its spade-like head and disappeared into the swamp. Local legends claim that a huge snake appears every seven years." Loren Coleman, Mysterious America: The Ultimate Guide To The Nation's Weirdest Wonders, Strangest Spots, and Creepiest Creatures.



Raynham, King Philip, Pine Swamp and Fowling Pond



Although Fowling Pond was the same size as nearby Lake Nip, this lake disappeared in less than a hundred years. By 1800, only small remnants of the pond remained. By the turn of the century, it had completely dried up to a swath of land known as Pine Swamp on King Philip's Street. In 1840, the following was included in a book called "Historical Collections of Massachusetts" by John Barber: "Fowling Pond, is itself a great curiosity. Before Philips' war it seems to have been a large pond, nearly two miles long and three quarters of a mile wide. Since then, the water is almost gone, and the large tract it once covered is grown up to a thick-set swamp of cedar and pine. That this, however, was once a large pond, haunted by fowls, and supplied with fish in great plenty, is more than probable, for here is found, upon dry land, a large quantity of white floor sand, and a great number of smooth stones, which are never found except on shores or places long washed by water."

"What could induce Philip to build his house here? It was undoubtedly, fishing and fowling, in this, then large pond. But more than than all, there is yet living in this town a man of more than ninety years old, who can well remember, than when he was a boy, he had frequently gone off in a canoe to fish in this pond; and says, that many a fish had been catched, where the pines and cedars are now more than fifty feet high. If an instance, at once so rare, and well attested, as this, should not be admitted as a curious scrap of the natural history of this country; yet it must be admitted as a strong analogical proof, that many of our swamps were originally ponds of water: but more than this, it suggests a new argument in the favor of the wisdom and goodness of that Diving Providence, which "changes the face of the earth," to supply the wants of man, as often as he changes from uncivilized nature, to a state of cultivation and refinement." (Collections of the The Massachusetts Historical Society.)

Carolyn Owen, former Old Colony Historical Society Archivist speculated on the mysterious disappearance: “Perhaps a great storm cut a swath through the embankment and drained the pond, it is one of nature’s curiosities where once King Philip rested and summered on the banks of a beautiful body of water and the tribe stocked to food to last through the long cold months ahead, there is now nothing left but the tall trees rising from a murky swamp.”

It is interesting to explore the connection between the location of the CCC worker's sighting of the monster snake and what that area was: A place King Philip called home. I personally have never heard of a disappearing lake. But if one was going to disappear, I am not surprised it vanished in the Bridgewater Triangle.

Almost every Bridgewater Triangle enthusiast knows this story. But there is much more to this legend. What Coleman didn't mention is that the King Philip's Street, located in Raynham (not Bridgewater), is home to the former summer camp of King Philip (hence the name of the street.)
King Philip's Street, Raynham, Photo by Kristen Good
In researching Fowling Pond recently, I was stunned when I stumbled across information that proved that Fowling Pond--a lake reported to have been a sizable body of water that mysteriously disappeared by the turn of the century--was on a tract of land now known as Pine Swamp. THIS, not Hockomock Swamp--as legend has it--is the true location of the Civil Conservation Corps workers terrifying sighting in the 1939.

Fowling Pond, I learned  (a very sacred spot to the Wampanoag) was the summer home of the great King Philip, Metacom, Chief of the Wampanoag Tribe, until the end of the war that was named after him; when he has shot, dismembered, his remains being intentionally scattered throughout southern Massachusetts so that his "soul would never rest." In times of peace Metacom spent many a summer night on the shores of Fowling pond in Raynham.
Fowling Pond--King Phillip's Summer home--was a pond the size of nearby Lake Nippenicket. But this lake mysteriously disappeared by the turn of the century. The spot where Fowling Pond was is located on King Philip's Street in Raynham is now a tract of land known as Pine Swamp. In the 1939,  CCC workers witnessed an enormous black snake that did not look indigenous to the area. Photo courtesy of the Old Colony Historical Society. All rights reserved.
Although Fowling Pond was the same size as nearby Lake Nip, this lake disappeared in less than a hundred years. By 1800, only small remnants of the pond remained. By the turn of the century, it had completely dried up to a swath of land known as Pine Swamp on King Philip's Street. In 1840, the following was included in a book called "Historical Collections of Massachusetts" by John Barber: "Fowling Pond, is itself a great curiosity. Before Philips' war it seems to have been a large pond, nearly two miles long and three quarters of a mile wide. Since then, the water is almost gone, and the large tract it once covered is grown up to a thick-set swamp of cedar and pine. That this, however, was once a large pond, haunted by fowls, and supplied with fish in great plenty, is more than probable, for here is found, upon dry land, a large quantity of white floor sand, and a great number of smooth stones, which are never found except on shores or places long washed by water."


"What could induce Philip to build his house here? It was undoubtedly, fishing and fowling, in this, then large pond. But more than than all, there is yet living in this town a man of more than ninety years old, who can well remember, than when he was a boy, he had frequently gone off in a canoe to fish in this pond; and says, that many a fish had been catched, where the pines and cedars are now more than fifty feet high. If an instance, at once so rare, and well attested, as this, should not be admitted as a curious scrap of the natural history of this country; yet it must be admitted as a strong analogical proof, that many of our swamps were originally ponds of water: but more than this, it suggests a new argument in the favor of the wisdom and goodness of that Diving Providence, which "changes the face of the earth," to supply the wants of man, as often as he changes from uncivilized nature, to a state of cultivation and refinement." (Collections of the The Massachusetts Historical Society.)


Carolyn Owen, former Old Colony Historical Society Archivist speculated on the mysterious disappearance: “Perhaps a great storm cut a swath through the embankment and drained the pond, it is one of nature’s curiosities where once King Philip rested and summered on the banks of a beautiful body of water and the tribe stocked to food to last through the long cold months ahead, there is now nothing left but the tall trees rising from a murky swamp.”


It is interesting to explore the connection between the location of the CCC worker's sighting of the monster snake and what that area was: A place King Philip called home. I personally have never heard of a disappearing lake. But if one was going to disappear, I am not surprised it vanished in the Bridgewater Triangle.

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SEA SERPENTS OF THE SOUTH SHORE: A HISTORY OF DOCUMENTED AND REPORTED ACCOUNTS OF THE SEA CREATURES OF HULL AND SCITUATE



Massachusetts lays claim as being the first state to document a sea serpent sighting. An Englishman by the name of Josselyn witnessed a creature “coiled like a cable upon a rock in Cape Ann“ in 1639. In August of 1817, the same area would be spotlighted when “The Gloucester Sea Serpent” was first sighted by local fisherman. The great creature was seen by locals almost every day that month. Books such as "Gloucester's Sea Serpent" by Wayne Soinim and “The Great New England Sea Serpent” by J.P. O’Neill chronicle the mass sighting. The subject of the Gloucester Sea Serpent was even the featured on an episode of Animal Planet’s “The Lost Tapes” in 2008. And in that same year, The Museum of Science held an exhibit about the legend.


Depiction of the Great Sea Monster of Gloucester.

 While legends of sea monsters in the North Shore have been spotlighted in the media for years, the sea serpents of the South Shore have kept their secret locked up in the memories of the Hull residents who remember stories passed down through generations about the Sea Serpent sightings at Nantasket Beach and the surrounding area. The details of the legends lie scattered in long-forgotten newspaper articles, spanning over 100 years.

The story of the sea monster that washed ashore on Mann Hill Beach in 1970 lies in the collective conscious of those who witnessed it. But to the rest of Massachusetts, it is virtually an unheard tale.
For 100 years, beginning in 1830 and diminishing in the 1930s, sightings of a sea serpent in the waters of Hull made Boston Globe headlines again and again. Some witnessed reported the creature as being over 100 feet. So many sightings were reported, that the town organized a “Sea Serpent Club” in 1911 in an attempt to prove its existence.
Nantasket, the beach community of Hull, was named by the Womapanoag tribe long before the town was incorporated in 1644. In Algonquin, Nantasket means “at the low tide place.” One of the first towns to be settled in America, the area of Nantasket would become one of New England’s most popular destination spots in the 1800s and well into the turn of the century.  With its grand hotels, fine restaurants and sweeping ocean views, Nantasket attracted the wealthy to summer here. But the wealthy were not the only ones to appreciate the pristine waters of Nantasket, with its rising cliffs stretching toward the rocky seascape of Gun Rock and deep tidal pools at low tide;  a sea serpent also summered at Nantasket with sightings reported in The Boston Globe in 1830, 1875, 1905, 1913, 1921, 1926 and 1937.



Nantasket Beach, 1905, during the time of Nantasket Sea Serpent Sightings.
In 1911, the town of Hull organized “A Sea Serpent Club,” whose members included town officials and other respected members of the community. The group placed a large telescope out over Green Hill and took turns being on “sea serpent watch” while Sea Serpent Club photographer, John Maguire stood by with his camera ready.

A chronology of the sightings south of Boston Harbor:
1830: A Boston man on weekend fishing excursion at Nantasket returns to town with a mammoth fish tale: That of seeinga 100-foot sea serpent pass dangerously close to to shore of Natntasket beach. The story quickly speads thorughout the streets of Boston
1875: Passengers and crew of the steamship Roman on a voyage from Boston to Philadelphia are shocked to see a creature that looked like a sea serpent not 400 yards from their ship. The ship’s Captain informs a passenger that the crew estimated the creature as being 120-feet long.

1877: An eyewitness writes a letter to the Editor of the Boston Globe about his remarkable experience at Nantasket. One mid afternoon in July of 1877, a man looked out from the piazza of the Waverly House to see a seafoam-spouting, 40-foot serpent-like monster beyond the beach.

1905: A fisherman and his wife see the creature. Henry Hatch described the creature: “The monster, which resembled a serpent in its sinuous movements, with great rapidity passed within 100 feet of the boat, furiously lashing the sea and leaving a wide wake in its course.” Mr. and Mrs. Hatch being highly respected members of society, the story is taken with great credence and word of the monster quickly spreads.

1911: In response to a mass of sightings, Hull residents charter a Sea Monster Club whose officers include members of the Hull Police Department.
1913: Two visitors to Nantasket Beach saw what they called a sea serpent in pursuit of hunting something in the water. The two men estimated the creature’s length as being 100 feet.

1913: On November 3, 1913, three separate vehicles all pulled over when they saw what they described as being “a war at sea.” “Swimming now nearer the shore was a huge serpent, scaligerous, horrendous, devilish. The scared lookers guessed him a 50-footer and fled.” The following day, the creature is spotted by a sea captain heading toward Cape Cod Canal. Captain Macy Coffin at first mistakes the creature for a waterspout. He later estimates the creature as being 60 feet.

1921: On the evening of July 22, 1921, residents and beachgoers watch amazed as a 40-foot creature, stranded in the shoal water off Nantasket flopped and turned, trying to free itself from the shallow waters. As the tide grew higher, the creature was able to escape its peril and swim away.

1926: On October 13, 1926 The Boston Globe ran this headline:  “MYSTERIOUS FISH PUZZLES Nantasket: Gives Residents a Thrill.”
As mysterious as the sightings were, so is the mystery of why the sightings suddenly stopped in the 1930s. In 1948, The Globe ran this headline: “Seeing” Sea Serpents Slipping” about the subject of the dwindling sea serpent sightings from Nahant to Provincetown. “Whatever particular serpent it might have been nobody found out, but in the 200 years that followed, his snakeship made suitable showings along the cost, appearing at Cape Ann and point north, with a Cape Cod route later thrown in and Plymouth and Provincetown among ports o’call.
At the height of his career in the 1800s the “most wonderful serpent” was the most wonderful indeed for he came in what approximated six delicious flavors and 57 varieties. Some observers reported his eyes were “as big as saucepans and two feet apart”—others said they were the size of dinner plates."


There would be no talk of sea monsters on the South Shore again for about thirty years when the eyes of a curious world were cast upon the town of Scituate when a story about a sea monster washing ashore made international news. William Conboy, lifelong resident of Scituate and witness of the Scituate Sea Creature recalls how far reaching the story was. “My brother Larry was in Vietnam and sitting around with his fellow soldiers listening to the radio when all of a sudden the news came on that they had found a sea monster in Scituate mass. He was like, “Hey! That's my hometown! The guys were like, “yeah, sure it is.”

On Sunday, November 15, 1970, hundreds flocked to Mann Hill Beach in Scituate to see a sea monster which washed ashore at about 3 p.m. In three days following, police estimated that over 10,000 curious spectators visited Mann Hill Beach to see the creature with their own eyes. Witnesses who initially saw the creature the claimed the carcass measured at least 50 feet and estimated it to weigh nearly 40 tons.

The Patriot Ledger reported that the carcass measured 23 feet without the head, but the newspaper also reported that spectators had been chopping up the creature and taking parts of it home as souvenirs of the highly unusual event for days before the creature was measured.” Scituate police estimated that perhaps ten feet of the creature’s body had been devoured by marine life before it washed ashore. On November 14, 1970, The Times-News published an article entitled, “Sea Serpent Is Studied By Scientists.” “Without question, it’s a sea serpent,” sea historian Edward Rowe Snow of Marshfield said Sunday night…The coral-colored creature has a small head, a massive long neck and a large finned body.”

Spectators gather at Mann Hill Beach to see what is left of the "sea creature."
“Officials of the New England Aquarium of Boston arrived at the scene Sunday night but were not about to identify the creature. “It’s definitely not a whale but more than that I can’t say,” Donald M. DeHart, executive director of New England Aquarium said.  DeHart called the creature “a very weird animal.”
Also called to the scene was Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Curator, Andrew Konnerth, who by the time he had arrived, had nothing more to examine than a rotting lump of mangled flesh.  

Spectators had been ripping away pieces of flesh from the creature as souvenirs. Edward Rowe Snow reported “People were walking up and down its back, ripping it to shreds.” Konnerth upon first examination of the carcass immediately proclaimed the creature was nothing more but a basking shark. The creature was buried on the beach but then later dug up and sent to the New England Aquarium for an attempted skeletal reconstruction. In 1971, the Aquarium released a statement that the case of the sea serpent of Scituate was officially closed. Their final conclusion that it was indeed a basking shark. But many of the thousands of witnesses on Mann Hill Beach that night were not convinced.
“It had flippers.  I’m no expert, but I don’t recall basking sharks have flippers. I said it before and I’ll say it again: Basking shark? What else you got?” William Conboy stated.

Maureen Shea saw the creature too. “I heard the report on the radio and piled my three kids and the rest of the kids at the bus stop into my beach wagon and took them to see it before dropping them off at school. It was a great experience and gave them plenty to talk about. To me, it bore no resemblance to a basking shark."


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